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(LinuxWorld) — With all the chatter accompanying two WINE-related announcements over the past week or so, I thought it might be a good time to take a long look at the WINE project to see what all the fuss has been about. TransGaming's announcement of the availability of WineX 3.0 got a lot of pixel dust, but that wasn't the only recent news about WINE. The cold, dead hand of the Microsoft monopoly also reached out to touch the project when Whil Hentzen, a leading proponent of Visual FoxPro (VFP) development on Linux, was contacted by a Microsoft manager and told it was a violation of the VFP EULA to run it on Linux. Reminiscing over WINE The WINE project has a long and stable history. Bob Amstadt was the original project coordinator. According to Amstadt's posts in comp.os.linux and comp.os.linux.misc newsgroups in the summer of 1993, the project began life in Jun... (more)

Caribbean Charm

YV&C International Yacht Vacations & Charters Magazine reports: The tiny island of Anguilla is beautiful and romantic - a place where you can really hide away from the rest of the world protected by the fiercely proud and loyal locals who are always on hand with a friendly smile. The most northerly of the Leeward Islands in the Eastern Caribbean, Anguilla measures only 26 kilometres by five across. It is hard to believe that as little back as 1984 this small, eel shaped island had no electricity and only dirt tracks for roads. Today, Anguilla radiates an unspoilt innocence and tourists are seen as welcome visitors. Sparingly developed, Anguilla has become internationally renowned for offering some of the world’s most exclusive five-star luxury resorts, has been voted as one the of worlds top ten destinations for its beaches, and has more than its fair share of fin... (more)

Fedora Software

Excerpted in part from Red Hat Fedora and Enterprise Linux 4 Bible by Christopher Negus (Wiley Publishing, 2005) In its Fedora Core Linux system, the Red Hat-sponsored Fedora Project aims to only include software that is Open Source and free of reasonable patent claims. As a result, at random intervals, an article or mailing list post will exclaim how Fedora sucks because it doesn't have xyz media player, certain file system support, or other favorite that's in some other Linux. Despite the fact that Red Hat sometimes seems bent on making money, proponents of the free and Open Source software movement can feel relatively safe that no one will hide code or sue them for using Fedora Core. But if not having a piece of software that's in some other Linux (or Windows) system is keeping you from switching to Fedora, then there may be a simple answer. You might just need t... (more)

Think Linus Torvalds Will Defer to Sun on GPLv3? The Answer May Hinge on a Bottle of Wine

Linux creator Linus Torvalds thinks the last GPLv3 draft is better than earlier drafts, but he still doesn't like it much, preferring the existing GPLv2 that the Linux kernel is currently licensed under. He has problems with the GPL 3's ban on so-called "tivoization" - Tivo shuts down if users mess with its DRM software - and deals like the Microsoft-Novell pact. " All I've heard are shrill voices about 'tivoization' (which I expressly think is OK)," he wrote Sunday on the Linux development mailing list, "and panicked worries about Novell-MS (which seems way overblown, and quite frankly, the argument seems to not so much be about the Novell deal, as about an excuse to push the GPLv3)." However, he told the mailing list that he might move to GPLv3 if Sun puts OpenSolaris under the GPLv3 like it's been saying it wants to so it can have a standard license. "I have yet... (more)

Design-thinking at IBM | @CloudExpo #Bluemix #BigData #IoT #Microservices

The Sunday New York Times published this article on IBM’s new way of thinking that is worth reading. The article states – The company is well on its way to hiring more than 1,000 professional designers, and much of its management work force is being trained in design thinking. “I’ve never seen any company implement it on the scale of IBM,” said William Burnett, executive director of the design program at Stanford University. “To try to change a culture in a company that size is a daunting task.” If you ask people inside IBM for a design-thinking success story, they are likely to mention Bluemix, a software tool kit for making cloud applications. In just one year, Bluemix went from an idea to a software platform that has attracted many developers, who are making apps used in industries as varied as consumer banking and wine retailing. In the past, building that kind... (more)

NetOp Remote Access from CrossTecCorp

Have you ever received offers by mail, e-mail, or phone to the point you just wanted to scream? I have. It got to the point where no matter what I received I would set it aside for later. (Later being the next day or the next Millennium). I appreciated receiving all the CDs and products for use, demo and evaluation, however, at times.it became overwhelming. Due to this I almost missed one of the most fantastic products I have ever used; CrossTecCorp's "NetOp Remote Access". My first encounter with NetOp was one of "Okay, when I get around to it I'll load another program that promises this, states that and usually falls short of their published and stated hype." The CD was pre-dated for a certain install time, and expired while in my: "get to it" pile. I received an e-mail from CrossTecCorp asking me if I had tried their product. I told them I had gotten too involve... (more)

Migrating to Linux not easy for Windows users

(LinuxWorld) — Windows 95 works well enough for my needs, but I'm eight years behind the technology curve. While I realize there are still many who rely on Apple IIs and Tandy 100s for their daily computing chores, it's time for me to start planning a migration route. I was mulling the possibilities when the OfficeSuperGeek (tOSG) talked me into a CPU upgrade, gave me a suitable motherboard from his bonepile, dumped some Linux distributions on my desk and said, "Here... try these." What follows is an 18-month tour of recent and now not-so-recent Linux distributions. Before we proceed, let me set your expectations about this overview. It isn't scientific. It's based on my impressions as a technical writer, Linux neophyte and curmudgeon. It's an appropriate and fair look from my humble newbie perspective. If you are a hairy-chested Linux administrator or programmer, ... (more)

Xandros 1.0: Easy on the eyes, easy to install

(LinuxWorld) — A couple of weeks ago, I took a second look at Knoppix and how it could be used to do a quick Debian install. Warts and all, the Knoppix install script provides a quick and dirty way for experienced Linux users to have Debian installed without suffering from what can be a psyche-bruising experience. It seems there are a number of distributions interested in doing the same thing. According to DistroWatch.com, 12 of the 105 distributions they are currently tracking are Debian-based. That dozen includes Knoppix, Lindows, Libranet and Xandros. This week we're going to look at Xandros, the successor to Corel Linux, which has recently released its 1.0 version. A brief history of Xandros Corel needed a cash infusion a couple of years ago. After receiving it in the form of a $150 million dollar investment by Microsoft, they announced they were getting o... (more)

Graphics Still the Hot Topic in Open Source .NET

Graphics and GUI (System.Drawing, System.Windows.Forms [SWF]) continue to be a couple of the most worked-on areas in both Mono and Portable.NET. Other areas under heavy development include cryptography, Web services, coverage and build tools for Mono, dependency charts for Portable.NET, and lots of bug fixes for both. Mono and Portable.NET Do GUI Differently In a project the size of .NET, choices often need to be made between options of nearly equal technical merit. Having more than one project (Portable.NET and Mono) can allow more than one choice to be made. The GUI code (SystemWindows.Forms and System.Drawing) is one area where the advantages of having multiple choices are apparent. The main Mono implementation of SWF uses Wine/Winelib, but there is also a side project using Gtk# (C# bindings for GTK) as the base for SWF (using Gtk# for SWF is separate from Gtk# ... (more)

Mainsoft, Novell Give Mono a Push

Novell and Mainsoft have committed programming resources to Mono; Mono has released version 0.29, adding Unicode support from IBM. Portable.NET has made progress on WinForms, including multidocument interface (MDI) applications using the XWindows library. Not Exactly True An Associated Press story claimed Novell has hired 40 programmers in India to work on Mono. The facts are that Novell has long had about 350 programmers working in India; they have transferred 40 of those to work full time on open source projects. Of those 40, between 5 and 10 are now working on Mono. The new Mono coders will work on all parts of the Mono project. Mono and DotGNU have always been international projects, and a number of corporations have committed to parts of Mono. Combining both, Mono is getting a boost from Mainsoft's commitment of a group of programmers in Israel to work on the M... (more)

Windows 2000 Source Code Leak "Is a Disaster for Open Source, Too"

In a commentary at NewsForge.com, Chris Spencer underlines how important it is that the Open Source / Linux community does not seek to take advantage of the leaked Windows 2000 source code. "Analysts are already out with their flapping lips talking about how the source code could benefit Microsoft's 'rivals.' We in the Linux community know they are talking about us," Spencer writes.  "The analysts have it all wrong though," he continues. "They missed it completely. Open source projects can't and would NEVER intentionally take advantage of this leak. This leak is as much a disaster to open source as it is to Microsoft and its users." The key to this assertion lies in the very openness of open source, Spencer points out. "The open source community lives in a glass box. We always show our source code and we accept help from anyone around the world to make our projects ... (more)